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Request for Public Comments: Coast Guard Regulatory Form

June 12th, 2017
Good Day,
An opportunity to effect change!  The U.S. Coast Guard has put forth a
request for public comments on “Evaluation of Existing Cast Guard
Regulations, Guidance Documents, Interpretative Documents, Collection of
Information” by Executive Orders for regulatory form.
You will have until 10 July, 2017 to provide your comments.
Feel free to contact me or your local examiner for questions.
Regards,
Mr. Al Waterford, USCG (ret.)
Program Manager, Commercial Fishing Vessel Safety
Fishing and Passenger Vessel Examiner
United States Coast Guard
Sector St. Petersburg
Preventions Department
155 Columbia Dr.
Tampa, FL 33606
Tel #: (813) 228-2196, ext. #8136
Fax #: (813) 228-2399
For More Info Go To:
Commercial Fishing Vessel “Checklist Generator”
“As a maritime regulator, it is imperative we engage and keep pace with industry.  The Coast Guard will facilitate commerce – we will not impede it.”  – Admiral Paul F. Zukunft, Commandant

Please click the following link to view the federal register: http://www.shrimpalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/CG_RRFT_Notice_170608.pdf

FDA Refused 22 Shrimp Entry Lines in April and May for Banned Antibiotics

June 7th, 2017

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has released information regarding entry line refusals for the period running from Tuesday, April 18th through Friday, May 26th.  For the full month of April and all but three days of May, 22 of the 227 (9.7%) total seafood entry line refusals reported have been of shrimp for reasons related to banned antibiotics.

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The twenty-two shrimp entry lines refused by the FDA for banned antibiotics in April and May were from China, Hong Kong, India, and Vietnam and were reported by four different FDA import divisions:

  • Suryamitra Exim Pvt Ltd (India), a company that is not currently listed on Import Alert 16-124, Import Alert 16-127, or Import Alert 16-129 (Suryamitra had been listed on Import Alert 16-129 for nitrofurans since March 15, 2017 but was removed from the list on June 2, 2017), had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with nitrofurans and veterinary drug residues by the Division of Northeast Imports on April 1, 2017;
  • Bluepark Seafoods (India), a company that was added to Import Alert 16-129 for nitrofurans in its shrimp on May 15, 2017, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues by the Division of Northeast Imports on April 5, 2017;
  • Minh Phu Seafood Corporation (Vietnam), a company that was added to Import Alert 16-124 for sulfamethoxazole in its shrimp on February 22, 2017 after its affiliate Minh Qui Seafood Co., Ltd. had been added to that Import Alert for sulfamethoxazole in its shrimp on July 22, 2016, had four entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with chloramphenicol by the Division of Southeast Imports on April 7, 2017;
  • Donggang Tianquan Aquatic Food C (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues by the Division of West Coast Imports on April 13, 2017;
  • Narong Seafood Co., Ltd. (Thailand), a company that was added to Import Alert 16-129 for nitrofurans in its shrimp on June 13, 2016, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with nitrofurans and veterinary drug residues by the Division of West Coast Imports on April 18, 2017;
  • Fuqing Dongwei Aquatic Products (China), a company that has been exempted from Import Alert 16-131 for breaded shrimp products only, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues and unsafe additives by the Division of West Coast Imports on April 18, 2017;
  • Kalyan Aqua & Marine Exports India (India), a company that is not currently listed on Import Alert 16-124, Import Alert 16-127, or Import Alert 16-129, had ten entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues by the Division of Southeast Imports on April 24, 2017;
  • Good Luck Product Co., Ltd. (Thailand), a company that was added to Import Alert 16-124 for ciprofloxacin in its shrimp on May 12, 2017, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues by the Division of West Coast Imports on May 11, 2017;
  • Shanhai Seafood Co., Ltd.  (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had one entry line refused for breaded shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues by the Division of Southwest Imports on May 16, 2017; and
  • Speed Ocean Industrial Co Ltd (Hong Kong), a company that is not currently listed on Import Alert 16-124, Import Alert 16-127, or Import Alert 16-129, had one entry line refused for “Shrimp & Prawns, Cakes, Balls, etc.” contaminated with veterinary drug residues by the Division of Northeast Imports on May 17, 2017.

Of the 47 entry lines of shrimp refused for banned antibiotics thus far in 2017, India (12) and Vietnam (12) accounted for the majority, while China (11) and Thailand (7) accounted for all but five of the remaining refusals.

 

Unusually High Shrimp Production in April; Dockside Prices Recovered

May 24th, 2017
NOAA has released landings data for shrimp harvested in the Gulf of Mexico for the month of April.  These data show that shrimp landings in April were well above historic norms.
Throughout the Gulf, 5.3 million pounds of shrimp were reported as landed in April.  This is over twice the fifteen-year historic average for the month (2.5 million pounds) and is far and away the most shrimp landed in an April over the last sixteen years.  Prior to this year, the highest volume of shrimp reported as harvested in the Gulf in April was 3.8 million pounds in 2006.
So far this year, 15.7 million pounds of shrimp has been landed in the Gulf of Mexico, an amount 32 percent higher than the prior sixteen-year historical average of 11.8 million pounds.  More shrimp has been landed in 2017 compared to the first four months of any year going back to 2001, setting a new high watermark above the 15.6 million pounds landed in 2006.
Only a small minority of shrimp landed during a year is harvested between January and April, with the first four months of each year accounting for anywhere between 7 and 14 percent of total annual landings.  However, the last year that shrimp landings in the first third of the year exceeded 15 million pounds – in 2006 – the total volume of shrimp landed in the Gulf exceeded 160 million pounds.  2016, in comparison, was a disappointing production year with only 93.9 million pounds reported as landed through the year.
Landings for the first third of the year are uniformly above historical averages in every part of the Gulf.  Louisiana’s 4.8 million pounds of shrimp in 2017 is 22 percent above the prior sixteen-year historical average of 4.0 million pounds and the highest volume recorded in the state since 2012.  The 4.4 million pounds reported as landed in Texas is slightly below the 4.5 million pounds reported in the first four months of 2015, but is 9.1 percent above the prior sixteen-year historical average of 4.1 million pounds.  Landings in the West Coast of Florida, at 2.8 million pounds in 2017, are the highest recorded since 2006 and 14.5 percent higher than the prior sixteen-year average of 2.4 million pounds.  In Alabama, the reported 3.2 million pounds of shrimp landed in 2017 is the highest volume recorded for the state in the data compiled by the Southern Shrimp Alliance and 140 percent above the prior sixteen-year historical average of 1.3 million pounds.  Even in Mississippi, the 418 thousand pounds of shrimp landed thus far this year is 20.4 higher than the prior fifteen-year historical average of 347 thousand pounds.
Although the volume of shrimp reported as landed has been unusually high, the dockside prices reported by NOAA have shown improvements compared to April 2016 across count sizes, with large increases reported in the Northern Gulf.  For that region, ex-vessel prices for U15 count shrimp increased from $8.42 per pound in April 2016 to $9.37 per pound in April 2017; ex-vessel prices for 26-30 count shrimp jumped from $3.16 per pound in April 2016 to $4.50 per pound in April 2017; and ex-vessel prices for 41-50 count shrimp more than doubled from $1.12 per pound in April 2016 to $2.55 per pound in April 2017.
Please click the following link to view SSA’s compilation and summary of April 2001/2002-2017 Shrimp Landings and Ex-Vessel Prices for April 2001-2017: http://www.shrimpalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/April-2017-Landings.pdf

Solid Senate Support for Combatting Illegal Shrimp Imports

May 11th, 2017
A bipartisan group of eleven powerful U.S. Senators has gone to bat in a big way for the domestic shrimp industry and U.S. shrimp consumers and against illegal shrimp imports by expressing their support for the full implementation of the new U.S. Seafood Import Monitoring Program. Their support was expressed in an April 27, 2017, letter to Department of Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross http://www.shrimpalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/04.27.17-Senate-Letter-to-Sec-Ross-FINAL-Signed1.pdf.
The letter, spearheaded by Louisiana Senator Bill Cassidy, MD (R-LA), and signed by Senators Cornyn (R-TX), Cochran (R-MS), Shelby (R-AL), Wicker (R-MS), Blumenthal (D-CT), Cruz (R-TX), Markey (D-MA), Tillis (R-NC), Kennedy (R-LA) and Strange (R-AL), cites the litany of illegal and fraudulent activities that plague much of the more than $5 billion of shrimp imported into the U.S. each year. These include evading U.S. antidumping duties recently extended by the International Trade Commission (ITC) on shrimp imports from China, India, Thailand and Vietnam in order to protect the U.S. industry – also with strong Congressional support.
The letter further cites the illegal use of dangerous, FDA-banned antibiotics by foreign shrimp farms and the unconscionable efforts of some shrimp importers to evade FDA’s enforcement of that ban designed to protect the health of U.S. consumers. As the letter notes, if that’s not bad enough, shrimp imports are also sometimes the product of Illegal, Unregulated and Unreported (IUU) fisheries, as well as slave labor.
“Shrimp is by far the most valuable seafood import to the United States, and in turn, the scale and scope of fraudulent activities associated with shrimp imports transcends that of any other seafood import”, said John Williams, Executive Director of the Southern Shrimp Alliance which is on record in strong support of this program during and since its development.
The program would require importers of record to secure federal permits, and to report to the U.S. government and keep records on, subject to audit, essential data on any seafood shipment presented for entry into U.S. commerce. The purpose of this data is to both verify that the product was legal when it was first caught or raised on a farm, and to ensure that the legal integrity of that product was maintained throughout the supply chain of custody and not misrepresented at the U.S. border.
As it stated in its public comments when the program was first proposed, “SSA believes the proposed seafood import traceability program is among the most promising tools for combatting the rampant, widespread fraud associated with both wild and farm-raised shrimp imports as well as the incidences of IUU fishing in foreign shrimp fisheries which include human trafficking and labor abuses.”
As noted by the Senators in their letter, despite these extensive fraudulent activities, the application of the program to shrimp imports was delayed indefinitely in response to dubious concerns that the program may be subject to challenge under the rules of the World Trade Organization (WTO). The concern, raised by the previous Administration, is that U.S. shrimp farms are not required by regulation to retain or report to the U.S. government the same data on their shrimp production as is required of shrimp importers under this new program. And so, it was argued, any traceability obligations would be an unfair burden on imports.
“To put this into context”, said Mr. Williams, “shrimp imports represent over 90 percent of the annual supply of shrimp to the U.S. market, while U.S. shrimp farms supply a fraction of 1 percent. Given the damage illegal shrimp imports have done to our domestic shrimp industry over the years, and given the serious threat to the health of millions of U.S. shrimp consumers from long-term exposure to illegal antibiotics, holding this program up for shrimp imports was simply a very poor decision. It is not an unreasonable burden on trade to expect importers to be able to prove that their products are legal and are actually what they claim them to be.”
Mr. Williams added; “Apparently, the Senators agree and have urged the Secretary Ross to ‘lift the stay’ and implement the program for shrimp imports as quickly as possible. We would like to once again thank Senator Cassidy for his leadership and the many U.S. Senators who signed this letter for their extraordinary support for our industry. We expect their request for Secretary Ross to do the right thing to protect U.S. shrimpers and U.S. shrimp consumers will carry great weight with him as he has made clear his own commitment to advance the best interests of the U.S. when it comes to trade policies.”

Louisiana Spring Shrimp Season to Open May 8th

May 5th, 2017
News Release

 

For Immediate Release
May 4, 2017

 

Contact: Ashley Wethey

Public Information
LDWF

(504) 286-8733

awethey@wlf.la.gov

 

 

Today, the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission set the opening dates of the 2017 Louisiana spring shrimp season based on data provided by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries biologists and public comments.

 

The opening dates for the 2017 Louisiana spring shrimp season are as follows:

  • The portion of state inside waters from the Mississippi/Louisiana state line to the eastern shore of South Pass of the Mississippi River to open at 6 a.m. on Monday, May 15
  • The portion of state inside waters from the eastern shore of South Pass of the Mississippi River to Freshwater Bayou to open at 6 a.m. on Monday, May 8
  • The portion of state inside waters from Freshwater Bayou to the Louisiana/Texas state line to open at 6 a.m. on Monday, May 15

LDWF biologists monitored hydrological parameters and conducted over 500 trawl samples throughout the state’s estuarine and nearshore waters over the last five weeks to develop management recommendations for spring inshore opening dates. The Department provided projections of the dates when a minimum of 50 percent of the inshore brown shrimp population sampled reach sizes of 100 count per pound or larger.

 

The Commission granted authority to the Secretary of the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries to delay these opening dates if biological and technical data indicate the need to do so, and; to close any portion of Louisiana’s inside waters to protect small juvenile white shrimp if biological and technical data indicate the need to do so, or enforcement problems develop. The Secretary is further granted the authority to open any area, or re-open any previously closed area, and to open and close special shrimp seasons in any portion of state waters.

 

For a map detailing these openings see above or click here.

 

For more information, contact Jeffrey Marx (337) 373-0032 or jmarx@wlf.la.gov.

 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov. To receive email alerts, signup at http://www.wlf.la.gov/signup

FDA’s Refusals of Indian Shrimp for Antibiotics Spike in April

May 5th, 2017
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has now released information regarding entry line refusals for the entire month of April. In total, 19 of the 114 (16.7%) of the entry line refusals reported for this month have been of shrimp for reasons related to banned antibiotics.
The FDA’s 19 entry line refusals for the month of April were the most for any month this year. Indian shrimp exporters (twelve) and Vietnamese shrimp exporters (twelve) have accounted for the majority of shrimp entry line refusals in 2017. All twelve refusals of Indian shrimp entry lines for banned antibiotics took place last month.
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The nineteen shrimp entry lines refused by the FDA for banned antibiotics in April were from China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam and were reported by six different FDA districts:
  • Kalyan Aqua & Marine Exports India (India)

    , a company that is not currently listed on Import Alert 16-124, Import Alert 16-127, or Import Alert 16-129, had
    ten entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the New Orleans District;
  • Minh Phu Seafood Corporation (Vietnam), a company that was added to Import Alert 16-124 for sulfamethoxazole in its shrimp on February 22, 2017 after its affiliate Minh Qui Seafood Co., Ltd. had been added to that Import Alert for sulfamethoxazole in its shrimp on July 22, 2016, had four entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with chloramphenicol in the Florida District;
  • Suryamitra Exim Pvt Ltd (India), a company that was added to Import Alert 16-129 for nitrofurans in its shrimp on March 15, 2017, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with nitrofurans and veterinary drug residues in the New England District;
  • Bluepark Seafoods (India), a company that is not currently listed on Import Alert 16-124, Import Alert 16-127, or Import Alert 16-129, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the New York District;
  • Narong Seafood Co., Ltd. (Thailand), a company that was added to Import Alert 16-129 for nitrofurans in its shrimp on June 13, 2016, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with nitrofurans and veterinary drug residues in the San Francisco District;
  • Fuqing Dongwei Aquatic Products (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues and an unsafe additive in the Los Angeles District;and
  • Donggang Tianquan Aquatic Food C (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the Los Angeles District.

ITC Votes to Maintain Antidumping Duties on Shrimp from China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam; Trade Relief on Brazilian Shrimp Will End

May 2nd, 2017

Today, the Commissioners of the U.S. International Trade Commission voted unanimously (5 to 0) to maintain antidumping duties on unfairly-traded shrimp imports from China, India, Thailand and Vietnam for another five years.  The Commissioners also voted unanimously (5 to 0) to revoke the antidumping duty order on shrimp from Brazil.

Because of the Commission’s vote today, trade relief will continue on shrimp imports from China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam and will not be subject to another sunset review until the summer of 2022.

Once a final determination by the Commission is published in the Federal Register, imports of shrimp from Brazil will no longer be subject to antidumping duties.  Over the last decade (2007 through 2016), the United States had imported a total of US$622,172 worth of frozen, non-breaded warmwater shrimp from Brazil, an average of $62,217 a year.  In the absence of antidumping duties, shipments of Brazilian shrimp are likely to increase although the extent and significance of the likely increase is unknown.

The Commission’s decision to maintain antidumping duties on shrimp imports from China, India, Thailand, and Vietnam came in response to the large-scale participation of U.S. shrimp industry members in the agency’s sunset review.  An unprecedented number of shrimpers provided the Commission with information regarding their business operations between 2012 and the third quarter of 2016.  This data, along with the information supplied by U.S. shrimp processors, was used by the Commission to ascertain the likely impact of revoking trade relief on the U.S. shrimp industry.

In addition to the information supplied by industry members to the Commission, several industry members also traveled to Washington D.C. to give direct testimony to the U.S. International Trade Commission and answer questions posed by Commissioners at a hearing held by the Commission on March 16, 2017.

Further, the shrimp industry’s arguments have been strongly supported by both state and federal elected officials.  Three U.S. Congressmen – Walter Jones (R-NC), Steven Palazzo (R-MS), and Garret Graves (R-LA) – and the Lt. Governor of Louisiana, Billy Nungesser (R-LA), testified in person at the Commission’s hearing in support of the trade relief.  Letters of support for the antidumping duties were submitted by the Governor of the state of Mississippi, Phil Bryant, and, separately, the Executive Director of the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, Jamie Miller, as well as by four U.S. Congressmen – Cedric Richmond (D-LA), Randy Weber (R-TX), Bradley Byrne (R-AL), and Clay Higgins (R-LA) – and by Senators Richard Shelby (R-AL), Luther Strange (R-AL), Senator Thad Cochran (R-MS), Senator Roger Wicker (R-MS), and Senator John Kennedy (R-LA).

“The Commission’s vote today shows what the shrimp industry can achieve when it works together towards the same goal,” said John Williams, the Executive Director of the Southern Shrimp Alliance.  “Over the last dozen years, the antidumping duty orders have played an essential role in providing our industry members with the ability to keep working.  We are grateful to all of the elected state and federal officials that stood with us during the sunset review and to everyone in the industry that sacrificed their time, energy, and resources to participate in the Commission’s process.”

Read the U.S. International Trade Commission’s News Release on the vote in the Sunset Reviews here:  https://usitc.gov/press_room/news_release/2017/er0502ll763.htm

 

 


Broad Support for Shrimp Antidumping Duties Voiced by Federal and State Elected Officials

April 26th, 2017

The U.S. International Trade Commission is currently considering whether to maintain antidumping duties on unfairly-traded shrimp imports from Brazil, China, India, Thailand and Vietnam for another five years.  If the Commission determines that dumped imports are likely to cause or continue material injury to the U.S. shrimp industry in the event of the removal of duties, the trade remedy will remain in effect.
In written arguments and testimony, the domestic shrimp industry contends that the return of unfairly-traded imports into the U.S. market would once again lead to a collapse in prices and, in result, even more fishermen leaving the commercial fishery.  A new flood of imports from the five countries would likely hollow out the remaining infrastructure of the industry and imperil the economies of small coastal communities from south Texas through North Carolina.
The shrimp industry’s arguments have been strongly supported by both state and federal elected officials.  At a hearing held by the Commission on March 16, 2017, three U.S. Congressmen – Walter Jones (R-NC), Steven Palazzo (R-MS), and Garret Graves (R-LA) – testified in person as to the importance of the shrimp industry to their districts and voiced their support for the trade remedy.  These Congressmen were joined at the hearing by the Lt. Governor of Louisiana, Billy Nungesser (R-LA).  Lt. Governor Nungesser described the importance of the commercial fishing industry to the state of Louisiana and appealed to the Commission to maintain the antidumping duties.
Demonstrations of support have also been made through written submissions for the formal record of the sunset review.  The Governor of the state of Mississippi, Phil Bryant, and, separately, the Executive Director of the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources, Jamie Miller, sent letters to the Commission asking that the antidumping duties be maintain.  Letters of support for the trade remedy have also been submitted by four additional U.S. Congressmen: Cedric Richmond (D-LA), Randy Weber (R-TX), Bradley Byrne (R-AL), and Clay Higgins (R-LA).  In addition, a joint letter emphasizing the importance of the shrimp industry to the state of Alabama and requesting that the antidumping duties be continued was sent to the Commission by Senators Richard Shelby (R-AL) and Luther Strange (R-AL).  Letters in support of the U.S. shrimp industry were also submitted by Senator Thad Cochran (R-MS), Senator Roger Wicker (R-MS), and Senator John Kennedy (R-LA).
“The support our industry has received by elected officials throughout the Gulf and South Atlantic coast has been extraordinary,” said John Williams, the Executive Director of the Southern Shrimp Alliance.  “On behalf of the entire membership of the Southern Shrimp Alliance, I want to express our deepest appreciation to everyone that has worked to ensure the future of the U.S. commercial shrimp fishery.”
The U.S. International Trade Commission has provisionally scheduled its final vote on whether to continue the antidumping duty orders for Tuesday, May 2, 2017.
Read the letters from Rep. Walter Jones, Steven Palazzo, and Garret Graves and Lt. Governor Nungesser requesting to appear at the Commission’s hearing here: http://www.shrimpalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Requests-to-Appear1.pdf
Read the letters of support submitted to the Commission by state and federal elected officials here: http://www.shrimpalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Support-Letters1.pdf

Dockside Prices for Small Shrimp Up In March, First Quarter Landings Above Historical Average

April 25th, 2017

NOAA’s reporting for landings of shrimp in the Gulf of Mexico for the month of March showed a slight decline in the volume of shrimp harvested this year (3.46 million pounds) compared to March of last year (3.51 million pounds).  However, the amount of shrimp landed by fishermen in the Gulf last month was 52.1 percent higher than the prior sixteen-year historical average for the month (2.28 million pounds).

 

Similarly, while total shrimp landings in the region for the first quarter of this year (10.16 million pounds) were slightly below those of the first quarter of last year (10.42 million pounds), they were 10.3 percent above the prior sixteen-year historical average for the Gulf (9.21 million pounds).

 

In total, shrimp landings in the first quarter of the year are a small portion of annual harvests.  Over the last fifteen years, shrimp landed in the first three months have comprised between five and eleven percent to the total amount of shrimp landed in the region.

 

Yet despite the relative lack of overall importance of first quarter landing figures, the data released by NOAA shows some interesting trends.

 

First, landings in 2017 have been spread more broadly amongst the states, with the exception of Mississippi.  Texas (2.99 million pounds) has accounted for 29.4 percent of all shrimp landed in the Gulf so far in 2017, while Louisiana (2.61 million pounds) has claimed 25.7 percent of landed shrimp this year, Alabama (2.31 million pounds) comprised 22.7 percent of all landed shrimp, and the west coast of Florida (1.91 million pounds) has been responsible for 18.8 percent of landings.

 

Second, ex-vessel prices for small count sizes increased significantly in March compared to March of 2016.  Ex-vessel prices for 41-50 count shrimp jumped from $1.74 per pound in March 2016 to $2.30 per pound last month in the Northern Gulf, from $1.71 per pound in March 2016 to $2.69 per pound in March 2017 on the west coast of Florida, and from $1.54 per pound in March 2016 to $3.11 per pound last month in the Western Gulf.

 

Please click the following link to view SSA’s compilation and summary of March 2001-2017 Shrimp Landings and Ex-Vessel Prices for March 2001-2017:

http://www.shrimpalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/March-2017-Landings.pdf

Minh Phu Again Leads the FDA’s April Shrimp Refusals for Antibiotics

April 25th, 2017

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has now released information regarding entry line refusals for the month of April through last Monday, April 17th. In total, 7 of the 46 (15.2%) of the entry line refusals reported for this month have been of shrimp for reasons related to banned antibiotics.

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The seven shrimp entry lines refused by the FDA for banned antibiotics in April were from China, India, and Vietnam and were reported by four different FDA districts:
• Minh Phu Seafood Corporation (Vietnam), a company that was added to Import Alert 16-124 for sulfamethoxazole in its shrimp on February 22, 2017 after its affiliate Minh Qui Seafood Co., Ltd. had been added to that Import Alert for sulfamethoxazole in its shrimp on July 22, 2016, had four entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with chloramphenicol in the Florida District;
• Suryamitra Exim Pvt Ltd (India), a company that was added to Import Alert 16-129 for nitrofurans in its shrimp on March 15, 2017, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with nitrofurans and veterinary drug residues in the New England District;
• Bluepark Seafoods (India), a company that is not currently listed on Import Alert 16-124, Import Alert 16-127, or Import Alert 16-129, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the New York District; and
• Donggang Tianquan Aquatic Food C (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the Los Angeles District.
This is the fourth straight month that the FDA has reported refusals of entry lines of shrimp from Minh Phu Seafood Corporation for reasons related to banned antibiotics.



Media Contact Information:

Deborah Long
804.360.0074
Deborah@Cohesive
Communications.com

Twitter: @ShrimpAlliance

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