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In February, Improvement in Shrimp Landings and Prices

March 22nd, 2017
NOAA has released shrimp statistics from the Gulf of Mexico for February.
In total, 3.2 million pounds of shrimp were landed in the Gulf last month, the third largest harvest recorded for the month going back to 2001.  Landings for the region were still 16.0% above the sixteen-year historic average for the month of February.  For all of 2017, shrimp landings in the Gulf are only 3.4% below the prior sixteen-year historic average at 6.7 million pounds.
The first two months of the year account for only a small portion of annual Gulf shrimp landings, generally between 4% and 7% of yearly totals.
While the volume of shrimp landed in the Gulf so far this year has been in line with historic averages, ex-vessel prices have shown significant improvement across count sizes.  At $10.42 per pound, the ex-vessel price for U15 shrimp in the Western Gulf is the highest reported by NOAA for any February.  Further, ex-vessel prices for 41-50 count shrimp increased for all regions compared to February of last year, jumping from $1.70 per pound in the Western Gulf in February 2016 to $3.27 per pound last month.
Please click the following link to view SSA’s compilation and summary of February 2001-2017 Shrimp Landings and Ex-Vessel Prices for February 2001-2017: http://www.shrimpalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/February-2017-Landings.pdf

LDWF to Open Shrimp Season In a Portion Of Louisiana Offshore Waters March 17

March 14th, 2017
News Release

 

For Immediate Release

 

March 13, 2017

 

Contact: Rene LeBreton

Public Information

 

LDWF

(504) 286-8745

rlebreton@wlf.la.gov

 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries announced the shrimp season will reopen in a portion of state outside waters seaward of Terrebonne Parish at 6 a.m. on Friday, March 17.

 

The area extends a distance of three nautical miles, seaward of the Inside/Outside Shrimp Line, from the northwest shore of Caillou Boca at -90 degrees 50 minutes 27 seconds west longitude westward to the eastern shore of the Atchafalaya River Ship Channel at Eugene Island as delineated by the channel red buoy line.

 

According to the most recent trawl samples taken by LDWF biologists, small white shrimp that had been in these waters since January have reached marketable sizes, and the closure is no longer necessary. Significant numbers of smaller size white shrimp still remain in State Outside Waters west of the Atchafalaya River Ship Channel to the western shore of Freshwater Bayou Canal at -92 degrees 18 minutes 33 seconds west longitude, and these waters will remain closed to shrimping until further notice.

 

The opening dates for the 2017 spring inshore shrimp season will be considered by the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission at their May 4 meeting.

Click HERE for a map detailing this opening.

 

For more information, contact Jeff Marx (337) 373-0032 or jmarx@wlf.la.gov.

 

The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries is charged with managing and protecting Louisiana’s abundant natural resources. For more information, visit us at www.wlf.la.gov. To receive email alerts, signup at http://www.wlf.la.gov/signup.

Chinese Shrimp Continue to Show Antibiotic Contamination

March 6th, 2017

Over the weekend, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) released information regarding entry line refusals for February.  In total, 10 of the 122 (8.2%) of the entry line refusals reported for last month were of shrimp for reasons related to banned antibiotics.

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The ten shrimp entry lines refused by the FDA for banned antibiotics in February were from China, Hong Kong, Malaysia and Vietnam and were reported by two different FDA districts:

  • Minh Phu Seafood Corporation (Vietnam), a company that was added to Import Alert 16-124 for sulfamethoxazole in its shrimp on February 22, 2017 after its affiliate Minh Qui Seafood Co., Ltd. had been added to that Import Alert for sulfamethoxazole in its shrimp on July 22, 2016, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the New York District;
  • Suntraco Food Industries Sdn. Bhd. (Malaysia), a company located in Peninsular Malaysia that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-136, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the New York District;
  • Lee Fung Marine Products Trading Co. (Hong Kong), a company that is not currently listed on Import Alert 16-124, Import Alert 16-127, or Import Alert 16-129, had two entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues and unsafe additives in the New York District;
  • Yantai Fujiyasu Food Company Limited (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues and unsafe additives in the New York District;
  • Wuhan City Yingnadi Int’l Trade (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues and unsafe additives in the San Francisco District;
  • Dalian Shanhai Seafood Co., Ltd. (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had two entry lines refused for breaded shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues and unsafe additives in the New York District; and
  • Ruian Huasheng Aquatic Products (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had two entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues and unsafe additives in the New York District.

There have not been reported refusals of entry lines for reasons related to antibiotics for shrimp shipped from Hong Kong since April of 2014.  Before last month, the FDA’s public records going back to 2002 indicate that there had only been a total of eleven entry line refusals of shrimp shipped from Hong Kong for reasons related to banned antibiotics.  The six entry lines of shrimp shipped from China, from four different companies, was the most refused in a month since March of 2016.

The FDA’s reporting may indicate that in response to the Import Alert on shrimp shipped to the United States from peninsular Malaysia, Chinese shrimp producers and exporters are exploring other ways to enter the U.S. market.  These shipments continue to raise concerns regarding the use of banned antibiotics in shrimp aquaculture in China, the world’s largest producer of farmed shrimp.

F/V Drill Conductor Courses in GA and SC

February 28th, 2017
One more reminder of all the drill conductor classes going on in GA and SC.  Last email it was 2 in SC now its 3, and all of them are free for commercial fishermen!  SO, get it while the FREE status lasts, when they run out of funding it will cost you $175.00, and the funding will run out, and they will require folks to take it, even though it’s not free, it’s the law!  I probably shouldn’t say it, but everybody you put to work on your boat, your teenage kids?, wives?, occasional fill-in crews?, should get the credential while the price is right.
The classes as scheduled are;
March 9, 2017
Murrells Inlet, SC – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop
Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM
Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others
Location:             Murrells Inlet Community Center,
4462 Murrells Inlet Road,
Murrells Inlet, South Carolina 29576
Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287
March 11, 2017
McClellanville, SC – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop
Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM
Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others
Location:             McClellanville Town Office,
405 Pinckney Street,
McClellanville, SC 29458
Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287
Brunswick, GA – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop
Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM
Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others
Location:             UGA Marine Extension & GA Sea Grant College Program,
Fisheries Building,
715 Bay Street,
Brunswick, GA 31520
Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287
March 25, 2017
Beaufort, SC - F/V Drill Conductor Workshop
Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM
Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others
Location:             Clemson Cooperative Extension Office,
18 John Galt Circle,
Beaufort, SC 29906
Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

2017 Begins With More Shrimp Landings and Improved Dockside Prices

February 23rd, 2017
Yesterday, NOAA released shrimp statistics from the Gulf of Mexico for the first month of 2017.
In total, 3.5 million pounds of shrimp were landed in the Gulf in January, the largest volume of shrimp reported since 2013.  Landings for the region were still 16.5% below the fifteen-year historic average for the month of January, but the total landings were the eighth highest recorded over the sixteen-year timespan for which the Southern Shrimp Alliance has tracked NOAA’s data.
January accounts for only a small portion of annual Gulf shrimp landings (generally between 3% and 5%).
Ex-vessel prices for medium and small count sizes were reported to have increased significantly through the Gulf region compared to January of 2016.  In the Western Gulf (Texas ports) 41/50 count and 36/40 count shrimp were reported to have ex-vessel prices of $1.40 per pound and $1.99 per pound, respectively, in January of last year.  Last month, the reported ex-vessel prices were $2.30 per pound and $3.19 per pound, respectively.  Ex-vessel prices for large count size shrimp remained roughly in line with where they have been each January going back to 2013.
Please click the following link to view SSA’s compilation and summary of January 2002-2017 Shrimp Landings and Ex-Vessel Prices for January 2001-2017:
http://www.shrimpalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/January-2017-Landings.pdf

Multiple FREE – AMSEA Commercial Fishing Vessel Drill Conductor Courses

February 21st, 2017

Drill Conductors Safety Course to be held at the following locations:

 

Murrells Inlet, SC – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop

Date: March 9, 2017

Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others

Location: Murrells Inlet Community Center, 4462 Murrells Inlet Road, Murrells Inlet, South Carolina 29576   Map

Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

 

McClellanville, SC – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop

Date: March 11, 2017

Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others

Location: McClellanville Town Office, 405 Pinckney Street, McClellanville, SC 29458   Map

Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

 

Brunswick, GA – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop

Date: March 11, 2017

Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others

Location: UGA Marine Extension & GA Sea Grant College Program, Fisheries Building, 715 Bay Street, Brunswick, GA 31520  Map

Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

 

These courses will fulfill the U.S. Coast Guard requirement; 46 CFR 28.270 – Instruction, Drills, and Safety Orientation for documented vessels operating beyond the boundary line (12nm on the Gulf of Mexico).

§ 28.270Instruction, drills, and safety orientation.

(a)Drills and instruction. The master or individual in charge of each vessel must ensure that drills are conducted and instruction is given to each individual on board at least once each month. Instruction may be provided in conjunction with drills or at other times and places provided it ensures that each individual is familiar with their duties and their responses to at least the following contingencies:

(1) Abandoning the vessel;

(2) Fighting a fire in different locations on board the vessel;

(3) Recovering an individual from the water;

(4) Minimizing the effects of unintentional flooding;

(5) Launching survival craft and recovering lifeboats and rescue boats;

(6) Donning immersion suits and other wearable personal flotation devices;

(7) Donning a fireman’s outfit and a self-contained breathing apparatus, if the vessel is so equipped;

(8) Making a voice radio distress call and using visual distress signals;

(9) Activating the general alarm; and

(10) Reporting inoperative alarm systems and fire detection systems.

(b)Participation in drills. Drills must be conducted on board the vessel as if there were an actual emergency and must include participation by all individuals on board, breaking out and using emergency equipment, testing of all alarm and detection systems, donning protective clothing, and donning immersion suits, if the vessel is so equipped.

(c)Training. No individual may conduct the drills or provide the instructions required by this section unless that individual has been trained in the proper procedures for conducting the activity.

 

However, remember that in 2010 the Coast Guard was charged by Congress to implement a change that would require the CAPTAINS of all commercial fishing vessels federally documented and state registered that are operating beyond 3nm of the coast to be certified to meet this requirement.  Now this HAS NOT been put into regulations as of yet.  But this class may be a chance to become or have a long standing captain certified.  More information on this change and others that are pending from the “CG Auth. Act of 2010” and “CG and Maritime Trans. Act of 2012” can be found at www.fishsafe.info.

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me or your local Commercial Fishing Vessel Safety Examiner.

 

Regards,

 

Mr. Al Waterford, USCG (ret.)

Program Manager, Commercial Fishing Vessel Safety

Fishing and Passenger Vessel Examiner

United States Coast Guard

Sector St. Petersburg

Preventions Department

155 Columbia Dr.

Tampa, FL 33606

Tel #: (813) 228-2196, ext. #8136

Fax #: (813) 228-2399

For More Info Go To:

FishSafe.info | Commercial Fishing Industry Vessel Safety

Commercial Fishing Vessel Checklist Generator

 

“As a maritime regulator, it is imperative we engage and keep pace with industry.  The Coast Guard will facilitate commerce – we will not impede it.”  – Admiral Paul F. Zukunft, Commandant

 

Drill Conducting Classes

February 15th, 2017

Another reminder about the March 11 class here in Brunswick, and to let you know a class in Murrells Inlet has been arranged for March 9, at the Murrells Inlet Community Center, as well as a class in McClellanville on March 11, at the McClellanville Town Office.

ALL are free for commercial fishermen, $175.00 for others, so it’s a good chance to get the training out of the way, I don’t think they’re going to slack up on it.

 

The Classes again are as follows:

 

Murrells Inlet, SC – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop

Date: March 9, 2017

Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others

Location: Murrells Inlet Community Center, 4462 Murrells Inlet Road, Murrells Inlet, South Carolina 29576   Map

Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

 

McClellanville, SC – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop

Date: March 11, 2017

Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others

Location: McClellanville Town Office, 405 Pinckney Street, McClellanville, SC 29458   Map

Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

 

Brunswick, GA – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop

Date: March 11, 2017

Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others

Location: UGA Marine Extension & GA Sea Grant College Program, Fisheries Building, 715 Bay Street, Brunswick, GA 31520  Map

Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

 

 

As always, feel free to give me a ring with any questions/comments you have or reply to the email and I’ll get back to you as soon as possible.

 

Lindsey Parker

Captain, R/V Georgia Bulldog

UGA Marine Extension &

Sea Grant College Program

Fisheries Building

715 Bay Street

Brunswick,  GA 31520

(912) 264 7331,office

912-617-7054, cell

912-264-2892, home

912-264-7312, fax

Drill Conductor Workshop Brunswick, GA

February 10th, 2017

untitled

 

F/V Drill Conductor Workshops in Brunswick, GA

Get the training you need to survive emergencies at sea!

AMSEA and Georgia Sea Grant are conducting a ten-hour Drill Conductor workshop in Brunswick, GA. The workshop is free to commercial fishermen thanks to support from the U.S. Coast Guard and NIOSH. The cost $175 for all others.

This course meets the US Coast Guard training requirements for drill conductors on documented commercial fishing vessels operating beyond the federal boundary line. Register online or call (907) 747-3287.

Instructor Nancy Jones will cover these topics:

  • EPIRBs, Flares, and MAYDAYs
  • Man Overboard Recovery
  • Firefighting
  • Immersion Suits and PFDs
  • Emergency Drills
  • Helicopter Rescue
  • Life Rafts
  • Abandon Ship Procedures
  • Cold-Water Survival Skills
  • In-the Water Practice Session

The location for the workshop is the UGA Marine Extension & Sea Grant College Program Fisheries Building, 715 Bay Street, Brunswick, GA 31520  Map

 

2017 Begins With A Large Number of Thai Shrimp Refusals for Banned Antibiotics

February 6th, 2017

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) has released information regarding entry line refusals for first month of 2017.  In total, 8 of the 145 (5.5%) entry line refusals in January were of shrimp for reasons related to banned antibiotics.

The total number of entry line rejections in January was the highest in a month since August of last year.  The eight shrimp entry lines refused by the FDA for banned antibiotics in January were from Thailand, Vietnam, and China and were reported by three different FDA districts:
  • Narong Seafood Co., Ltd. (Thailand), a company that has been listed on Import Alert 16-129 for nitrofurans in its shrimp since June 13, 2016, had a total of five entry lines refused for shrimp products contaminated with nitrofurans and veterinary drug residues in the New England District – three of “shrimp and prawns,” one of “shrimp chow mein dinners, mixed fishery/seafood products,” and one of “stuffed pasta with shrimp (N.E.C.), mixed fishery/seafood products;
  • Minh Phu Seafood Corporation (Vietnam), a company not currently listed on Import Alerts 16-124, 16-127, or 16-129, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the Los Angeles District;
  • Ca Mau Seafood Processing & Service Joint Stock (Vietnam), a company that has been listed on Import Alert 16-124 for enrofloxacin in its shrimp since December 8, 2016, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the New York District; and
  • Jiachang Aquatic Product Co. Ltd. (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had one entry line refused for “seafood salad (shrimp, crab, etc.), mixed fishery/seafood products” contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the Los Angeles District.
The number of entry lines reported as refused in January for Thai-origin shrimp is extremely unusual.  Prior to last month, since 2002 the public information available indicates that there have been a total of just 17 entry lines of shrimp refused from Thailand for reasons related to banned antibiotics.  Fifteen of those seventeen refusals took place in 2003.  In other words, in the thirteen years between 2004 and 2016, just two entry lines of shrimp from Thailand were refused by the FDA for reasons related to banned antibiotics.

All five entry line refusals were of shrimp products shipped from Narong Seafood Co., Ltd.  As the Southern Shrimp Alliance has previously noted, Narong Seafood Company (BAP: P10456) has been certified under the Global Aquaculture Alliance’s (GAA) Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) program as a one-star shrimp processing plant.  Currently, the GAA’s website indicates that Narong Seafood Company’s BAP certification is valid until April 20, 2017.
The GAA previously reported making an unannounced audit of Narong Seafood Company’s processing plant in Samutsakorn, Thailand in June 2013 to investigate allegations made in a report published by Warehouse Workers United and the International Labor Rights Forum alleging the mistreatment of workers.  The GAA explained that its auditors “found no evidence at the time of the audit substantiating the severe allegations” in the report.  The GAA also explained that it had found “a number of non-conformities in the plant” but that these were not determined to be systematic in nature and that the “BAP program requires that all certified facilities correct any deficiencies and provide objective evidence verifying this in order to maintain BAP certification.”
The year previous, Narong Seafood Company, Ltd. had been in the news after it was announced in October 2012 that the company had reached a settlement with the Attorney General of the state of Massachusetts in response to the Attorney General’s allegation that the Thai company was “illegally using pirated software without paying the appropriate licensing fees . . . .”
The entry line refusals for shrimp products shipped by Narong Seafood Co., Ltd. for reasons related to banned antibiotics are another unusual development for any Thai company.

Gulf Shrimp Landings Down in 2016

January 23rd, 2017
NOAA has now released shrimp landings data from the Gulf of Mexico for the month of December and all of 2016.
Last month, 5.8 million pounds of shrimp were landed in the Gulf of Mexico, roughly 34.0% below the prior sixteen-year historical average for the month (8.9 million pounds).  This was the lowest total of shrimp landed in the Gulf in the month of December in the years for which the Southern Shrimp Alliance has catalogued NOAA data going back to 2000.
For the year, 93.8 million pounds of shrimp have been landed in the Gulf, 27.6% below the average landings for the prior sixteen years (129.7 million pounds).
The “shrimp statistics” reported by NOAA indicate that 2016 was the fourth straight year of declines in the volume of shrimp landed in the Gulf of Mexico.  However, the volume reported of shrimp landed in the Gulf of Mexico in NOAA’s annual publication Fisheries of the United States has differed from the amounts reported in the “shrimp statistics.”  For example, NOAA’s “shrimp statistics” report that 106.9 million pounds of shrimp were landed in the Gulf in 2015, down from 114.5 million pounds in 2014.  However, the 2015 Fisheries of the United States reported that 123.9 million pounds of shrimp were landed in the Gulf in 2015 (HLSO-equivalent weight), up from 116.6 million pounds in 2014.  It is likely that the 2016 Fisheries of the United States, when published by NOAA, will report a higher volume of shrimp landed in the Gulf of Mexico than that reported by the “shrimp statistics” monitored by the Southern Shrimp Alliance.
While volumes have remained significantly lower than historical averages, ex-vessel prices reported by NOAA have strengthened.  Western and Northern Gulf ex-vessel prices for U15 count shrimp were the highest ever reported for a December ($9.92/lb. and $9.50/lb., respectively).  The most significant price increases were again seen in 41-50 count shrimp, with ex-vessel prices in December reported as being significantly higher than last December in all regions of the Gulf and prices in the Western Gulf up to $3.15/lb. compared to $1.40/lb. in December 2015.
Please click the following link to view SSA’s compilation and summary of December 2000-2016 Shrimp Landings and Ex-Vessel Prices for December 1999-2016:

http://www.shrimpalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/December-2016-Landings.pdf



Media Contact Information:

Deborah Long
804.360.0074
Deborah@Cohesive
Communications.com

Twitter: @ShrimpAlliance

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