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Multiple FREE – AMSEA Commercial Fishing Vessel Drill Conductor Courses

February 21st, 2017

Drill Conductors Safety Course to be held at the following locations:

 

Murrells Inlet, SC – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop

Date: March 9, 2017

Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others

Location: Murrells Inlet Community Center, 4462 Murrells Inlet Road, Murrells Inlet, South Carolina 29576   Map

Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

 

McClellanville, SC – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop

Date: March 11, 2017

Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others

Location: McClellanville Town Office, 405 Pinckney Street, McClellanville, SC 29458   Map

Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

 

Brunswick, GA – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop

Date: March 11, 2017

Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others

Location: UGA Marine Extension & GA Sea Grant College Program, Fisheries Building, 715 Bay Street, Brunswick, GA 31520  Map

Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

 

These courses will fulfill the U.S. Coast Guard requirement; 46 CFR 28.270 – Instruction, Drills, and Safety Orientation for documented vessels operating beyond the boundary line (12nm on the Gulf of Mexico).

§ 28.270Instruction, drills, and safety orientation.

(a)Drills and instruction. The master or individual in charge of each vessel must ensure that drills are conducted and instruction is given to each individual on board at least once each month. Instruction may be provided in conjunction with drills or at other times and places provided it ensures that each individual is familiar with their duties and their responses to at least the following contingencies:

(1) Abandoning the vessel;

(2) Fighting a fire in different locations on board the vessel;

(3) Recovering an individual from the water;

(4) Minimizing the effects of unintentional flooding;

(5) Launching survival craft and recovering lifeboats and rescue boats;

(6) Donning immersion suits and other wearable personal flotation devices;

(7) Donning a fireman’s outfit and a self-contained breathing apparatus, if the vessel is so equipped;

(8) Making a voice radio distress call and using visual distress signals;

(9) Activating the general alarm; and

(10) Reporting inoperative alarm systems and fire detection systems.

(b)Participation in drills. Drills must be conducted on board the vessel as if there were an actual emergency and must include participation by all individuals on board, breaking out and using emergency equipment, testing of all alarm and detection systems, donning protective clothing, and donning immersion suits, if the vessel is so equipped.

(c)Training. No individual may conduct the drills or provide the instructions required by this section unless that individual has been trained in the proper procedures for conducting the activity.

 

However, remember that in 2010 the Coast Guard was charged by Congress to implement a change that would require the CAPTAINS of all commercial fishing vessels federally documented and state registered that are operating beyond 3nm of the coast to be certified to meet this requirement.  Now this HAS NOT been put into regulations as of yet.  But this class may be a chance to become or have a long standing captain certified.  More information on this change and others that are pending from the “CG Auth. Act of 2010” and “CG and Maritime Trans. Act of 2012” can be found at www.fishsafe.info.

 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me or your local Commercial Fishing Vessel Safety Examiner.

 

Regards,

 

Mr. Al Waterford, USCG (ret.)

Program Manager, Commercial Fishing Vessel Safety

Fishing and Passenger Vessel Examiner

United States Coast Guard

Sector St. Petersburg

Preventions Department

155 Columbia Dr.

Tampa, FL 33606

Tel #: (813) 228-2196, ext. #8136

Fax #: (813) 228-2399

For More Info Go To:

FishSafe.info | Commercial Fishing Industry Vessel Safety

Commercial Fishing Vessel Checklist Generator

 

“As a maritime regulator, it is imperative we engage and keep pace with industry.  The Coast Guard will facilitate commerce – we will not impede it.”  – Admiral Paul F. Zukunft, Commandant

 

Drill Conducting Classes

February 15th, 2017

Another reminder about the March 11 class here in Brunswick, and to let you know a class in Murrells Inlet has been arranged for March 9, at the Murrells Inlet Community Center, as well as a class in McClellanville on March 11, at the McClellanville Town Office.

ALL are free for commercial fishermen, $175.00 for others, so it’s a good chance to get the training out of the way, I don’t think they’re going to slack up on it.

 

The Classes again are as follows:

 

Murrells Inlet, SC – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop

Date: March 9, 2017

Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others

Location: Murrells Inlet Community Center, 4462 Murrells Inlet Road, Murrells Inlet, South Carolina 29576   Map

Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

 

McClellanville, SC – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop

Date: March 11, 2017

Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others

Location: McClellanville Town Office, 405 Pinckney Street, McClellanville, SC 29458   Map

Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

 

Brunswick, GA – F/V Drill Conductor Workshop

Date: March 11, 2017

Hours: 8:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Cost: Free for commercial fishermen, $175 for all others

Location: UGA Marine Extension & GA Sea Grant College Program, Fisheries Building, 715 Bay Street, Brunswick, GA 31520  Map

Registration: Register online or call (907) 747-3287

 

 

As always, feel free to give me a ring with any questions/comments you have or reply to the email and I’ll get back to you as soon as possible.

 

Lindsey Parker

Captain, R/V Georgia Bulldog

UGA Marine Extension &

Sea Grant College Program

Fisheries Building

715 Bay Street

Brunswick,  GA 31520

(912) 264 7331,office

912-617-7054, cell

912-264-2892, home

912-264-7312, fax

Drill Conductor Workshop Brunswick, GA

February 10th, 2017

untitled

 

F/V Drill Conductor Workshops in Brunswick, GA

Get the training you need to survive emergencies at sea!

AMSEA and Georgia Sea Grant are conducting a ten-hour Drill Conductor workshop in Brunswick, GA. The workshop is free to commercial fishermen thanks to support from the U.S. Coast Guard and NIOSH. The cost $175 for all others.

This course meets the US Coast Guard training requirements for drill conductors on documented commercial fishing vessels operating beyond the federal boundary line. Register online or call (907) 747-3287.

Instructor Nancy Jones will cover these topics:

  • EPIRBs, Flares, and MAYDAYs
  • Man Overboard Recovery
  • Firefighting
  • Immersion Suits and PFDs
  • Emergency Drills
  • Helicopter Rescue
  • Life Rafts
  • Abandon Ship Procedures
  • Cold-Water Survival Skills
  • In-the Water Practice Session

The location for the workshop is the UGA Marine Extension & Sea Grant College Program Fisheries Building, 715 Bay Street, Brunswick, GA 31520  Map

 

2017 Begins With A Large Number of Thai Shrimp Refusals for Banned Antibiotics

February 6th, 2017

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) has released information regarding entry line refusals for first month of 2017.  In total, 8 of the 145 (5.5%) entry line refusals in January were of shrimp for reasons related to banned antibiotics.

The total number of entry line rejections in January was the highest in a month since August of last year.  The eight shrimp entry lines refused by the FDA for banned antibiotics in January were from Thailand, Vietnam, and China and were reported by three different FDA districts:
  • Narong Seafood Co., Ltd. (Thailand), a company that has been listed on Import Alert 16-129 for nitrofurans in its shrimp since June 13, 2016, had a total of five entry lines refused for shrimp products contaminated with nitrofurans and veterinary drug residues in the New England District – three of “shrimp and prawns,” one of “shrimp chow mein dinners, mixed fishery/seafood products,” and one of “stuffed pasta with shrimp (N.E.C.), mixed fishery/seafood products;
  • Minh Phu Seafood Corporation (Vietnam), a company not currently listed on Import Alerts 16-124, 16-127, or 16-129, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the Los Angeles District;
  • Ca Mau Seafood Processing & Service Joint Stock (Vietnam), a company that has been listed on Import Alert 16-124 for enrofloxacin in its shrimp since December 8, 2016, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the New York District; and
  • Jiachang Aquatic Product Co. Ltd. (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had one entry line refused for “seafood salad (shrimp, crab, etc.), mixed fishery/seafood products” contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the Los Angeles District.
The number of entry lines reported as refused in January for Thai-origin shrimp is extremely unusual.  Prior to last month, since 2002 the public information available indicates that there have been a total of just 17 entry lines of shrimp refused from Thailand for reasons related to banned antibiotics.  Fifteen of those seventeen refusals took place in 2003.  In other words, in the thirteen years between 2004 and 2016, just two entry lines of shrimp from Thailand were refused by the FDA for reasons related to banned antibiotics.

All five entry line refusals were of shrimp products shipped from Narong Seafood Co., Ltd.  As the Southern Shrimp Alliance has previously noted, Narong Seafood Company (BAP: P10456) has been certified under the Global Aquaculture Alliance’s (GAA) Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) program as a one-star shrimp processing plant.  Currently, the GAA’s website indicates that Narong Seafood Company’s BAP certification is valid until April 20, 2017.
The GAA previously reported making an unannounced audit of Narong Seafood Company’s processing plant in Samutsakorn, Thailand in June 2013 to investigate allegations made in a report published by Warehouse Workers United and the International Labor Rights Forum alleging the mistreatment of workers.  The GAA explained that its auditors “found no evidence at the time of the audit substantiating the severe allegations” in the report.  The GAA also explained that it had found “a number of non-conformities in the plant” but that these were not determined to be systematic in nature and that the “BAP program requires that all certified facilities correct any deficiencies and provide objective evidence verifying this in order to maintain BAP certification.”
The year previous, Narong Seafood Company, Ltd. had been in the news after it was announced in October 2012 that the company had reached a settlement with the Attorney General of the state of Massachusetts in response to the Attorney General’s allegation that the Thai company was “illegally using pirated software without paying the appropriate licensing fees . . . .”
The entry line refusals for shrimp products shipped by Narong Seafood Co., Ltd. for reasons related to banned antibiotics are another unusual development for any Thai company.

Gulf Shrimp Landings Down in 2016

January 23rd, 2017
NOAA has now released shrimp landings data from the Gulf of Mexico for the month of December and all of 2016.
Last month, 5.8 million pounds of shrimp were landed in the Gulf of Mexico, roughly 34.0% below the prior sixteen-year historical average for the month (8.9 million pounds).  This was the lowest total of shrimp landed in the Gulf in the month of December in the years for which the Southern Shrimp Alliance has catalogued NOAA data going back to 2000.
For the year, 93.8 million pounds of shrimp have been landed in the Gulf, 27.6% below the average landings for the prior sixteen years (129.7 million pounds).
The “shrimp statistics” reported by NOAA indicate that 2016 was the fourth straight year of declines in the volume of shrimp landed in the Gulf of Mexico.  However, the volume reported of shrimp landed in the Gulf of Mexico in NOAA’s annual publication Fisheries of the United States has differed from the amounts reported in the “shrimp statistics.”  For example, NOAA’s “shrimp statistics” report that 106.9 million pounds of shrimp were landed in the Gulf in 2015, down from 114.5 million pounds in 2014.  However, the 2015 Fisheries of the United States reported that 123.9 million pounds of shrimp were landed in the Gulf in 2015 (HLSO-equivalent weight), up from 116.6 million pounds in 2014.  It is likely that the 2016 Fisheries of the United States, when published by NOAA, will report a higher volume of shrimp landed in the Gulf of Mexico than that reported by the “shrimp statistics” monitored by the Southern Shrimp Alliance.
While volumes have remained significantly lower than historical averages, ex-vessel prices reported by NOAA have strengthened.  Western and Northern Gulf ex-vessel prices for U15 count shrimp were the highest ever reported for a December ($9.92/lb. and $9.50/lb., respectively).  The most significant price increases were again seen in 41-50 count shrimp, with ex-vessel prices in December reported as being significantly higher than last December in all regions of the Gulf and prices in the Western Gulf up to $3.15/lb. compared to $1.40/lb. in December 2015.
Please click the following link to view SSA’s compilation and summary of December 2000-2016 Shrimp Landings and Ex-Vessel Prices for December 1999-2016:

http://www.shrimpalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/December-2016-Landings.pdf

U.S. Government Accountability Office Forum on Commercial Fishing Vessel Classification Standards

January 18th, 2017
This e-mail is to inform you about a new U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) Engagement on Commercial Fishing Vessel Classification Standards-code 100955. This engagement is in response to a congressional mandate in Section 318 of the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2015 and includes the following key questions:
1) What national and regional trends, if any, emerge from the rates of marine casualties and human injuries and deaths involving commercial fishing vessels?
2) How do U.S. regulations for commercial fishing vessel classification, including vessel length, compare with other countries’ regulations?
3) What cost impacts, if any, do statutory requirements for commercial fishing vessel classification have on ship construction and maintenance?
4) How do the benefits and challenges of building and maintaining a commercial fishing vessel to class society standards compare with alternate approaches?
As part of our work, we will be holding a forum at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council’s February meeting to discuss the scope of our work and obtain insight into the key issues and concerns of council members; commercial fishing vessel owners and operators; and shipbuilding and ship architectural firms stemming from the amendments set forth in the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2015,especially with regard to the following:
  •          key costs and challenges associated with constructing and maintaining commercial fishing vessels to classification standards;
  •          benefits and savings realized from classing vessels;
  •          impact that classing requirements have had on the shipbuilding/ ship architectural industry; and
  •           potential benefits or challenges of the alternative-to-class approach.
This forum will be held at 7 pm on Wednesday, February 1, 2017, in the Toulouse B meeting room at the Astor Crown Plaza – New Orleans French Quarter. Hotel information is as follows:
739 Canal Street @ Bourbon Street
New Orleans, LA  70130
(503) 962- 0500
Attached to this email, you will find a pamphlet that provides more details about us, our engagement, and how we plan to operate the forum. Additionally, you will find attached the questionnaire we developed for this event. Since this will be an excellent opportunity for those working in the gulf coast commercial fishing industry, we would greatly appreciate the assistance of your organization in forwarding this invitation to your members and encouraging them to attend.
Moreover, we ask any interested parties who complete the questionnaire prior to attending our forum on February 1st, to email their responses to me at StockdaleE@gao.gov; otherwise, we will take any completed questionnaires at the meeting. All information will be kept strictly confidential.
All interested parties planning to attend are also asked to RSVP to this email. This will help us ensure that we are able to accommodate everyone in attendance. I am also available by email (stockdalee@gao.gov) or telephone (614-804-7562) to answer any questions or concerns. We would really like to see a good turnout for this event, so we can better inform the U.S. Congress on the impact of recent changes to commercial fishing vessel classification standards.
Thanks!
Erin
Erin L. Stockdale, Sr. Analyst
Acquisition and Sourcing Management
U.S. Government Accountability Office
Dayton Field Office
2196 D Street, Area B, Building 39
Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio  45433
(614) 804- 7562

Please click the following link to view the Public Forum on Fishing Vessel Classification Standards Flyer:  http://www.shrimpalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/ALL_STAFF-.pdf

Please click the following link to view the GAO Forum Handout:
http://www.shrimpalliance.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/ALL_STAFF-handout.pdf

Fishing Vessel Drill Conductor Workshop in Palacios, Texas

January 17th, 2017
The Alaska Marine Safety Education Association (AMSEA) will offer a Fishing Vessel Drill Conductor Workshop in Palacios, Texas on Friday, January 27, 2017 from 8:00 AM to 7:00 PM at the Matagorda County Navigation District #1, 1602 Main Street. This workshop is an excellent opportunity for commercial fishermen and other mariners to gain hands-on training with marine safety equipment and learn best practices for surviving emergencies at sea.
Instructor Bruce Dyleski will cover man-overboard recovery and firefighting; EPIRBs, flares, and maydays; emergency drills; helicopter rescue; life rafts and abandon ship procedures; PFDs, immersion suits, and cold-water survival skills.
The workshop meets the U. S. Coast Guard training requirements for drill conductors on documented commercial fishing vessels operating beyond the federal boundary line. It is offered to commercial fishermen at no cost, thanks to support from the United States Coast Guard and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The cost for all others in $175 and all mariners are welcome. Interested mariners may register online at www.amsea.org or call AMSEA at (907) 747-3287.
# # #
Best regards,
Jeff Pearson
Office Manager/Promotions
Alaska Marine Safety Education Association
2924 Halibut Point Rd.
Sitka, AK 99835
(907) 747-3287 voice
(907) 747-3259 fax

Fishing Vessel Drill Conductor Workshop in Kemah, Texas

January 17th, 2017
The Alaska Marine Safety Education Association (AMSEA) will offer a Fishing Vessel Drill Conductor Workshop in Kemah, Texas on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 from 8:00 AM to 7:00 PM at Triad Marine, 1155 FM 518 Road. This workshop is an excellent opportunity for commercial fishermen and other mariners to gain hands-on training with marine safety equipment and learn best practices for surviving emergencies at sea.
Instructor Bruce Dyleski will cover man-overboard recovery and firefighting; EPIRBs, flares, and maydays; emergency drills; helicopter rescue; life rafts and abandon ship procedures; PFDs, immersion suits, and cold-water survival skills.
The workshop meets the U. S. Coast Guard training requirements for drill conductors on documented commercial fishing vessels operating beyond the federal boundary line. It is offered to commercial fishermen at no cost, thanks to support from the United States Coast Guard and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). The cost for all others in $175 and all mariners are welcome. Interested mariners may register online at www.amsea.org or call AMSEA at (907) 747-3287.
# # #
Best regards,
Jeff Pearson
Office Manager/Promotions
Alaska Marine Safety Education Association
2924 Halibut Point Rd.
Sitka, AK 99835
(907) 747-3287 voice
(907) 747-3259 fax

Petition In Opposition to Rule Changes Requested by The North Carolina Wildlife Federation Has Over 3,000 Supporters

January 13th, 2017

A petition to amend rules relating to commercial fishing in state waters in North Carolina was submitted to the North Carolina Marine Fisheries Commission on November 2, 2016 by The North Carolina Wildlife Federation.  The North Carolina Wildlife Federation’s petition seeks restrictions on shrimp trawling that would limit the time allowed for trawling and the type of gear that could be used while shrimp trawling.

In response to The North Carolina Wildlife Federation’s petition, the North Carolina Marine Fisheries Commission has scheduled a public hearing to receive input regarding the petition and to explore questions regarding the implementation of the petition’s recommendations.  The public hearing will be held beginning at 12:30 pm on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 in New Bern, North Carolina at the New Bern Riverfront Convention Center, 203 South Front Street, New Bern, NC.

A counter-petition opposing The North Carolina Wildlife Federation’s recommendations located on Change.org has already obtained the support of over 3,000 individuals.  The petition, “Keep NC seafood (especially SHRIMP) on our Tables,” states:

SAVE LOCAL SEAFOOD!

Local businesses, fishing families and coastal communities depend on catches from trawlers – namely shrimp – as a source of economic commerce, as well as locally-grown, organic protein.

More than 90 percent of all shrimp consumed in the country is imported. Importing this highly prized commodity not only puts Americans out of jobs, it jeopardizes our health by marketing a poorly inspected product.

By designating the state’s inland waters, as well as ocean waters three miles out as permanent secondary nursery areas, the fishery for trawlers – which harvest blue crab, flounder and mainly shrimp – would be highly compromised. As a result, North Carolina would [lose] a considerable amount of income to foreign competition and consumers across the country would [lose] access to this bountiful and highly prized resource. In addition, the rules would surely lead to the demise of a historic profession that has spanned generations of coastal citizens.

The petition asks the commission to designate all coastal fishing waters (including the ocean out to three miles) not otherwise designated as nursery areas as special secondary nursery areas; establish clear criteria for the opening of shrimp season; and define the type of gear and how and when gear may be used in special secondary nursery areas during shrimp season.

Please consider consumers and our coastal economy when imposing strict rules in our state’s waters. Keep our fishermen working and keep seafood on our tables. Do not designate North Carolina waters as permanent secondary nursery areas.

Members of the public may also comment on The North Carolina Wildlife Federation’s petition in writing (until January 20th) through an e-mail to NCWFPetition@ncdenr.gov or by mail to NCWF Petition, Marine Fisheries Commission Office, N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, P.O. Box 769, Morehead City, NC 28557.

The North Carolina Marine Fisheries Commission’s December 14, 2016 press release for the meeting is as follows:

Advisory committees to meet, accept public comment on petition impacting shrimp trawling

MOREHEAD CITY — Five advisory committees to the North Carolina Marine Fisheries Commission will meet jointly next month to discuss and take public comment on a petition for rulemaking calling for habitat protections that, if adopted, would impact shrimp trawl fishing in most North Carolina waters.

The meeting will begin at 12:30 p.m. on Jan. 17 at the New Bern Riverfront Convention Center, 203 South Front St., New Bern. The Finfish, Shellfish/Crustacean, Habitat and Water Quality, Northern Regional and Southern Regional advisory committees will be asked to review and comment on the petition for rulemaking submitted Nov. 2 by the North Carolina Wildlife Federation.

To accommodate as many speakers as possible, those who wish to give public comment at the meeting will be limited to three minutes per person.

Members of the public also may comment on the petition in writing to NCWFPetition@ncdenr.gov or to:

NCWF Petition
Marine Fisheries Commission Office
N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries
PO Box 769
Morehead City, N.C. 28557

Written comments will be accepted from Dec. 20 until 5 p.m. Jan. 20.

The petition asks the commission to designate all coastal fishing waters (including the ocean out to three miles) not otherwise designated as nursery areas as special secondary nursery areas; establish clear criteria for the opening of shrimp season; and define the type of gear and how and when gear may be used in special secondary nursery areas during shrimp season.

Specific requests of the petition include:

  • Limiting shrimp trawling to three days a week in the daytime only in special secondary nursery areas
  • Limiting the total trawl head rope to 90 feet (which will limit the size of the net) in all state waters
  • Limiting tow times to 45 minutes in special secondary nursery areas
  • Opening shrimp season once the shrimp count in Pamlico Sound reaches 60 shrimp per pound, heads on
  • Implementing an 8-inch size limit for spot and a 10-inch size limit for American croaker
  • Requiring all fishermen to use two Division of Marine Fisheries-certified bycatch reduction devices when trawling in state waters

The commission will discuss and vote on the petition for rulemaking at its February business meeting.

Find the Change.org petition “Keep NC seafood (especially SHRIMP) on our Tables” here:  https://www.change.org/p/north-carolina-marine-fisheries-commission-keep-nc-seafood-especially-shrimp-on-our-tables

Read the North Carolina Marine Fisheries Commission’s December 14, 2016 press release regarding the hearing here:  http://portal.ncdenr.org/web/mf/nr-89-2016-public-comment?p_p_id=56_INSTANCE_YqF5&p_p_lifecycle=0&p_p_state=exclusive&p_p_mode=view&p_p_col_id=column-2&p_p_col_count=2&_56_INSTANCE_YqF5_struts_action=%2Fjournal_content%2Fview&_56_INSTANCE_YqF5_groupId=38337&_56_INSTANCE_YqF5_articleId=29989678&_56_INSTANCE_YqF5_viewMode=print

Read The North Carolina Wildlife Federation’s November 2, 2016 Petition here:  http://portal.ncdenr.org/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=a8c99680-f624-486c-9f7b-d4319c2cf853&groupId=38337

 

I encourage everyone who cares about American jobs and desires to have fresh local shrimp to sign the petition to keep North Carolina shrimp fishermen working.

John Williams

 

2016 Was a Record Year for FDA Refusals of Shrimp Contaminated with Banned Antibiotics

January 4th, 2017
News Alert:  2016 Was a Record Year for FDA Refusals of Shrimp Contaminated with Banned Antibiotics
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) today released information regarding entry line refusals for the last week of November and the month of December.  In total, 7 of the 270 (2.6%) entry line refusals in the months of November and December were of shrimp for reasons related to banned antibiotics.
For all of 2016, as the table below indicates, the FDA has refused 133 entry lines of shrimp for banned antibiotics – the third highest annual number of refusals since 2002.

 

The steep drop in entry line refusals of shrimp contaminated by antibiotics between 2015 and 2016 was due to an Import Alert imposed by the FDA early in 2016 on Malaysian shrimp imports.  As shrimp from Malaysia has exited the U.S. market, the number of overall refusals has substantially declined.
However, the massive increase in Malaysian shrimp refusals has masked the FDA’s enhanced focus on antibiotics in shrimp generally.  If the table above is adjusted to exclude refusals of shrimp shipped from Malaysia, the FDA’s reporting indicates that the agency refused more shrimp for reasons related to banned antibiotics this year than any prior year for which data are available.

The total number of refusals in 2016 is largely attributable to three countries:   India (95); Vietnam (17); and China (15).  The number of Indian shrimp entry lines being refused for banned antibiotics is unprecedented and the total number of entry lines refused this year was equal to the highest number of entry lines of Chinese shrimp refused for antibiotic contamination:

The seven shrimp entry lines refused by the FDA for banned antibiotics in November and December were from Vietnam and China and were reported by four different FDA districts:
  • Tan Phong Phu Seafood Company (Vietnam)

    , a company not currently listed on Import Alerts 16-124 or 16-129, but became the first Vietnamese company listed on Import Alert 16-127 for chloramphenicol in its shrimp on March 30, 2016, had
    two entry lines refused for shrimp contaminated with chloramphenicol and salmonella in the Chicago District in December;
  • Nha Trang Seaproduct Company (Vietnam), a company not currently listed on Import Alerts 16-124, 16-127, or 16-129, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the Southwest District in December;
  • Thuan Phuoc Seafoods and Trading (Vietnam), a company that has been listed on Import Alert 16-124 for chloramphenicol in its shrimp since December 12, 2013, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the Los Angeles District in December;
  • Shenzen Speed Ocean Intl Transp (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the New York District in November;
  • Oemerida International Trade (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the New York District in November; and
  • Yantai Fujiyasu Food Company Lim (China), a company that has not been exempted from Import Alert 16-131, had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues in the New York District.


Media Contact Information:

Deborah Long
804.360.0074
Deborah@Cohesive
Communications.com

Twitter: @ShrimpAlliance

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