FDA Refuses Only One Shipment of Antibiotic-Contaminated Shrimp in November

On Sunday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published detailed data regarding 82 total seafood entry line refusals in November, of which just one (1.2%) was of shrimp for reasons related to banned antibiotics.

Through November of this year, the FDA has refused a total of 55 entry lines of shrimp for reasons related to banned antibiotics.  Between January and June, the FDA reported refusing 45 entry lines of shrimp due to veterinary drug residues.  However, between July and November, the FDA has refused just ten (10) entry lines.

Moreover, other than the single refusal of a shrimp entry line in November, no other seafood entry line was refused for the presence of banned antibiotics last month.  These results likely reflect internal agency determinations to divert resources away from the monitoring of aquacultured seafood products imported into the United States.

 

 

The one shrimp entry line refused for antibiotic residues in November was for a shipment from a company located in Hong Kong:

  • Wing Cheong Marine Product (Hong Kong), a company that is not currently listed on Import Alert 16-124 (“Detention Without Physical Examination of Aquaculture Seafood Products Due to Unapproved Drugs”), Import Alert 16-127 (“Detention Without Physical Examination of Crustaceans Due to Chloramphenicol”), or Import Alert 16-129 (“Detention Without Physical Examination of Seafood Products Due to Nitrofurans”), had one entry line refused for shrimp contaminated with veterinary drug residues and unsafe additives by the Division of West Coast Imports on November 21, 2022.

Although just one entry line of shrimp was refused by the FDA in November for veterinary drug residues, another three entry lines of shrimp were refused due to the presence of salmonella.

Filed Under